See how nfs client is connected to nfs server

Find out the configuration with which the nfs client is connected to the nfs server.

 

Bouncing my head to my keyboard while trying to find out where is the bottleneck on an nfs client-server relationship, I found out how to see the configuration with which the nfs client is connect to the server:

 

nfsstat -m

 

And the output is:

/nfsshare from nexenta.nfs-servers.example.com:/volumes/datastore/dataset/
 Flags: rw,relatime,vers=4,rsize=32768,wsize=32768,namlen=255,hard,proto=tcp,port=0,timeo=600,retrans=2,sec=sys,clientaddr=10.0.2.21,minorversion=0,local_lock=none,addr=10.0.2.245

 

Knowing exactly how the client is connected to the server, you can find more easily where the problem is.

 

Using the nfsstat -m command, you get the information about all nfs mounts. The -m switch is present on centOS, but abscent on FreeBSD, in which I do also performance tests.

 

You can also find all this information and also all the information about all mounts ( not only nfs mounts) if you execute:

 

cat /proc/mounts

 

I am trying to get this info on FreeBSD,  if everyone knows everything about this, please post a comment. I also asked a question at http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/91594/nfs-mount-properties-options-in-freebsd to help me find the solution.

How to install mercurial on centos

You can setup mercurial on a server just to keep your teams repository. It’s pretty easy to install it to your CentOS machine

Mercurial is a free, distributed source control management tool. It efficiently handles projects of any size and offers an easy and intuitive interface. You can setup mercurial on a server just to keep your teams repository. It’s pretty easy to install it to your CentOS machine , or vm. You can just run the command:

yum install mercurial

 

and that’s all. I think that it’s easy to install it to other Linux distributions too. Now all you have to do is to add a group for the developers and a user for each of them to have access to the repositories.

If your team of developers use windows as their primary operating system Mercurial is the right choice for a scm. Mercurial just works on Windows. The definitive Mercurial book (written by Bryan O’Sullivan – a fellow Irishman) is concise, and exhaustive. Better yet, if you want that warm fuzzy feeling a GUI gives you, then look no further than TortoiseHg – a top quality tool. It’s good to learn Mercurial mainly on the command line. I wanted to understand how Mercurial worked, and how it is different from SVN.

How to install dig, host, and nslookup – bind-utils on CentOS

If you want to use on of the linux commands:

dig, host or nslookup on a CentOS machine

If you want to use on of the linux commands:

dig, host or nslookup on a CentOS machine and you get the error message:

-bash: nslookup: command not found

you have to install the bind-utils package.

Just run the command:

yum install bind-utils